Properties

SVT is responsible for the protection and care of diverse conservation lands that include wetlands, sensitive habitats, trails and other open spaces including major sanctuaries. Many of these properties have trail maps, which can be found below. Click on the property name for more information and directions to parking.

The Land Protection and Stewardship staff are always on the look out for new properties under threat of development or help in maintaining our current responsibilities. If you would like to get more information about assisting this team, please visit our Volunteer page or call us at 978-443-5588.

A fun way to encourage children and other reluctant hikers to visit the outdoors is Letterboxing. SVT encourages you to search for them on an SVT property near you!

To see what wildlife has been seen around the watershed, or to report new sightings, visit our Nature Sightings page. Free maps to our properties are available at most property kiosks and at the SVT office at Wolbach Farm in Sudbury; or you can look at the list below, where you can download our maps.

More information regarding regulations on our properties.

Trail Maps:

Brues Woods, by Wayne Hall
Brues Woods, by Wayne Hall

PDF icon Brues Woods Brochure and Map

Brues Woods' (39.3 acres) upland trails pass through mature pines. Plank walkways carry the trail across Bridge Brook and through damp areas in the adjacent wooded wetland with its tangled under-story and fallen trees.

An interpretive nature trail can be followed through 6 stops along the trail with the downloadable brochure. A complete tour takes less than an hour over moderately easy terrain, with some briefly steep spots. Be prepared for mud.

Cowassock Woods, by Joyce Dwyer
Cowassock Woods, by Joyce Dwyer

PDF icon Cowassock Woods Brochure and Map

Cowassock Woods and Ashland Town Forest are composed of a mosaic of mixed hardwood forest types, wetlands, vernal pools and stream corridors. Sixty to eighty year old mixed hardwood forests – mixed oak and oak/hickory forest types - are the dominant natural communities.

The trail along the field at Elliott Concord River Preserve.

PDF icon Elliott Concord River Preserve Trail Map

Although small itself, the Elliott Concord River Preserve directly abuts over 900 acres of the Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, which in turn is contiguous with another 760 acres of additional protected open space, mostly to the north. To the south, only a small, undeveloped inholding separates this 1,600+ acre complex from another 200 acres of National Wildlife Refuge (the Concord Impoundments), which in turn connects across the river to other protected open space in Concord and back into Carlisle, including historic Estabrook Woods.

Gray Reservation, by Mark Levinson
Gray Reservation, by Mark Levinson

PDF icon Gray Reservation Map and Brochure

In 1976 Mrs. Stephen Gray most generously gave about fifty five acres of land to SVT as a sanctuary for birds and wildlife. The land is almost entirely surrounded by residential development, its preservation as open space is, therefore, particularly valuable.

The Sudbury River at Greenways Conservation Area, by Wayne Hall
The Sudbury River at Greenways Conservation Area, by Wayne Hall

PDF icon Greenways Brochure and Map

In 1995 the Sudbury Valley Trustees and the Town of Wayland, with the assistance of the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Management, purchased one of the last large parcels of open space in the town: the Paine Estate.

Hamlen Woods, by Joyce Dwyer
Hamlen Woods, by Joyce Dwyer

PDF icon Hamlen Woods Map

The Hamlen Woods (80.9 acres) tract encompasses open water, swamp, upland forest and the headwaters of Snake Brook, fed by a series of springs and draining from the wetlands. Outstanding natural features include many outcroppings of bedrock, mostly Westborough Quartzite, and a glacier formed kettle-hole.

Hazel Brook Conservation Area, by Raj Das
Hazel Brook Conservation Area, by Raj Das

PDF icon Hazel Brook Trail Map

PDF icon Hazel Brook Brochure and Interpretive Map

Hazel Brook Conservation Area (48.4 acres) rewards your senses almost immediately by the sound of the rushing waters of Hazel Brook, soon followed by the sight of a beautiful pond.

Don't stop there, for a moderately easy hike uphill through the quiet woods leads you to a network of more than 65 miles of trails through Weston Town Forest and other public land. A figure-eight route through the property takes about one hour, plus any additional time you choose to devote to Weston town trails beyond.

PDF icon Hop Brook Natural Area Interpretive Trail

This 16.5 acre reservation situated amidst residential properties, a pasture, and a hayfield, is mostly red maple swamp, and features about 1200 feet of Hop Brook, a large pond, and two small ponds.  

In 2010, as part of his Eagle Scout Project, Matthew Barnes of Sudbury Troop 63 created an interpretive brochure and posted markers along the trail that correspond with the points in his writings and on the map.

Memorial Forest, by Raj Das
Memorial Forest, by Raj Das

PDF icon Memorial Forest Map and Brochure

Please Note: Learn more about recent changes to trail use rules at Memorial Forest due to stream crossing conditions

Straddling the border of Sudbury and Marlborough, lies 615 acres of public and private open space dedicated primarily to conservation. This includes the General Federation’s Memorial Forest and Wildlife Sanctuary, two tracts of Marlborough State Forest, and conservation lands owned by Town of Sudbury and City of Marlborough.

Mount Pisgah Conservation Area, by David Kindler
Mount Pisgah Conservation Area, by David Kindler

PDF icon Mount Pisgah Trail Map

The Mt. Pisgah complex of lands is a region including parts of Boylston, Berlin, Bolton, and Northborough. The land is wild, rural, and quiet, with few roads through the surrounding area. Along with an extensive trail system, several beautiful vistas provide looks at the surrounding landscape.

Nobscot Scout Reservation, by David Blohm
Nobscot Scout Reservation, by David Blohm

PDF icon Nobscot Scout Reservation Trail Map

In 1996, the Knox Trail Council of the Boy Scouts of America was created as a result of consolidation of two local councils: Norumbega and Algonquin. The Knox Trail Council, led by a volunteer board of prominent community leaders, now administers the Scout program in the 21-town Greater Metrowest region and owns two large camping properties devoted towards the outdoor education of students as well as religious and community youth groups. Located in Bolton around Little Pond, the E. Paul Robsham Jr.

PDF icon NW Framingham Trail Map

Northwest Framingham retains more than 1,100 acres of open space valuable for wildlife, farming, and quiet recreation. Sudbury Valley Trustees owns 12 parcels of land here, totaling more than 200 acres, and has participated in the protection of hundreds of additional acres now owned by Callahan State Park and the Town of Framingham or farmed under the state’s program of Agricultural Preservation restrictions.

The Concord River from Ralph Hill Conservation Area.
The Concord River from Ralph Hill Conservation Area.

PDF icon Ralph Hill Brochure and Map

The conservation area is comprised of the area extending from the beaver pond eastward to Route 3 , as well as the entire area south of the dirt access road that bisects Vietnam Veterans’ Memorial Park, exclusive of the new soccer field and parking lot.

Round Hill, by Jill Kern
Round Hill, by Jill Kern

PDF icon Round Hill Interpretive Brochure

PDF icon Round Hill Brochure and Map

Round Hill (38.6 acres) provides maximum reward for minimum effort. At an elevation of 227 feet, Round Hill rises only about 100 feet above the surrounding terrain but the view from the top stretches for miles, taking in river, meadows and rolling terrain, especially in winter.

Upper Mill Brook, by Dustin Briggs
Upper Mill Brook, by Dustin Briggs

PDF icon Upper Mill Brook Brochure and Map

Upper Mill Brook Conservation Area (60.6 acres) is a diverse property which contains both open and wooded swamps, deciduous woodland, a brook and several ponds, with beavers in residence.

While a basic tour takes about 45 minutes, additional extensions onto Wayland conservation land can add up to another 2 hours. The main trail is easy; however the extension to Claypit Hill Road is moderately difficult.

Walkup & Robinson Memorial Reservation, by Jill Kern
Walkup & Robinson Memorial Reservation, by Jill Kern

PDF icon Walkup Reservation Brochure and Map

The Walkup Reservation is an island of protected land in a sea of commercial development. The property includes mixed hardwood and conifers and old pasture uplands, an open field with wet meadow, a wooded wetland with vernal pools, and a small pond.

PDF icon Turenne Brochure and Map

The Turenne family purchased the 18-acre property only a few weeks before they turned it over to Sudbury Valley Trustees in 1990. An 1870s map shows that the property had been owned by the Newtons, one of the older families in Southborough.